Meet Sally


This is Sally, my Subaru Outback. I purchased her in 2005 when she was only three years old and I had finally had it with unsafe vehicles that were pieces of junk. When I brought Sally, she only had about 25,000 miles on her and she and I have added nearly 90,000 more miles together. She has been good to me, kept my family safe all these years and I love her and I couldn’t imagine my life without her.

About two years ago, however, I started having problems with acceleration and I took her from mechanic to mechanic, and no one could figure out what was wrong with her. They would diagnose her with things that had nothing to do with the problem that I came in for. Everything else was maintenance and wear and tears from tires to brakes to suspension, etc., and she always had all her tune-ups, oil changes, other maintenance, etc. on time. I never took her for granted because she has taken really good care of me.

90,000 miles is a lot of miles for five years and now at nearly eight years old, she is still holding on at close to 118,000 miles. Many of those were trips to NYC when I lived in Southeast PA. I visited my sister nearly twice a month. She took me to Ohio many nights at least three or four times a year when I still resided in PA to visit family. She also pulled a trailer from PA to Ohio – an eight hour drive – when we moved to Ohio nearly three years ago. My husband drove her to/from Cleveland to Columbus once a month for a nearly a year. Yes, Sally has been through a lot, but she kept us safe through many close calls and less than careful drivers. I was rear-ended driving her about three and a half years ago (on my 31st birthday to be exact), and as the dealership promised, she kept me safe and her damage was minimal. She was back to me in three days and I missed her terribly in those three days.

Like me, she has been tough and resilient and even through it took two years and many misdiagnoses to diagnose her, she held on and she is still holding on. She needs a new catalytic converter and it’s quite an expensive job that can range from $1300 to $1600. My husband thinks we should save the money and trade her in for a minivan. I don’t want to trade Sally in because in so many ways, she reminds of me. Tough, practical, careful, and resilient. She has never let me down and when something was wrong, she always found a way of telling me so that I took care of her before the problem escalated.

I had plenty of cars before her but she is my favorite. I believe if I repair her Sally will hang on for another 60,000 miles, but my husband thinks she is an “old” car and old cars are repair bills waiting to happen. If I HAD TO trade Sally in, I would trade her in for another Subaru but we can’t afford another Subaru so trading her would mean I would get stuck with a car that won’t make me feel as safe as she has all these years or as reliable as she has been all these years. The other thing is that up until this point, Sally’s repairs have been wear and tear and maintenance and she is also quite an expensive car to repair. To me, she is as classy as they come. To my husband, she is too expensive for us.

What do you guys think? Should I repair Sally or should I trade her in? I think Sally’s got another 60,000 miles in her. My husband disagrees.

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3 thoughts on “Meet Sally

  1. REPAIR. My hubs was in the dealership industry for years. Trust me. When you trade in, you don't know what you are getting. Even new cars have breakdowns. At least with Sally, you know what has been fixed, and what might need fixed in the future.,

  2. Lana, if you can convince him, get the new CC and stick with Sally. Subarus are truly excellent, well-built cars with a great rep for longevity. Mr Wren and I have have owned two of them over the years; they both ran to nearly 300,000. Dee is right, too, ANY car can break down, new or otherwise, and since you feel so confident and safe driving yourself and your family around in Sally, the repair may just be the best route, even though the cost hurts.-Wren

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